Daily Reflections

Agents of God In Our Time?

July 11, 2019

Genesis 44:18-21, 23b-29; 45:1-5

Psalm 105:16-17, 18-19, 20-21

Matthew 10:7-15

 

 

 

Joseph and his brothers occupy a major part of the Book of Genesis (Chapters 37 to 50) which provides a banquet of food for thought. Years after selling Joseph into slavery his brothers are forced to beg from Pharaoh through his Second in Command – whom they do not realize is Joseph!

Concerned that his half-brothers might harbor the same jealousy towards Benjamin (his only full blood brother) which led them to oppress him, Joseph plots to rescue Benjamin. As his scheme unfolds he realizes that they have changed. They are now concerned for their father and are willing to suffer for the well-being of their other half-brother.

When Joseph reveals himself to his brothers they become terrified that he will now take revenge on them. Instead he promises them life and prosperity for their entire families, naming God as their benefactor saying: It was really for the sake of saving lives that God sent me here ahead of you!

Joseph has come to understand himself as an agent of God called to proclaim God’s mercy. This is a frequent situation in the Bible: God uses ordinary humans to bring about the well-being of persons in struggle.

Many theologians today suggest that God does not overrule the built-in laws of God’s creation – and certainly does not interfere by creating natural disasters. Rather, people often have a hand in the genesis of natural disasters while other persons who are intimately in touch with their Creator, Redeemer, and Guide; have respect for all of God’s creation; and care deeply for others who suffer act to bring about relief from oppression, persecution, and natural disasters as agents of forgiveness, healing and change.

These theologians also suggest that our understanding of Natural Law must continue to develop as science expands our understanding of the workings of the universe and its innumerable parts…

Today’s Gospel reports Jesus urging his Apostles: “As you go, make this proclamation: ‘The Kingdom of heaven is at hand’. Cure… raise… cleanse… drive out… ”

How is the Spirit of God urging us to be God’s agents in our time?

 

Fr. John M. Lee, C.P., is Retreat Director of Bishop Molloy Retreat House, “The Passionist Spiritual Center in New York City”,   www.bishopmolloy.org

Genesis 44:18-21, 23b-29; 45:1-5

Psalm 105:16-17, 18-19, 20-21

Matthew 10:7-15

 

Agents of God In Our Time?

 

Joseph and his brothers occupy a major part of the Book of Genesis (Chapters 37 to 50) which provides a banquet of food for thought. Years after selling Joseph into slavery his brothers are forced to beg from Pharaoh through his Second in Command – whom they do not realize is Joseph!

Concerned that his half-brothers might harbor the same jealousy towards Benjamin (his only full blood brother) which led them to oppress him, Joseph plots to rescue Benjamin. As his scheme unfolds he realizes that they have changed. They are now concerned for their father and are willing to suffer for the well-being of their other half-brother.

When Joseph reveals himself to his brothers they become terrified that he will now take revenge on them. Instead he promises them life and prosperity for their entire families, naming God as their benefactor saying: It was really for the sake of saving lives that God sent me here ahead of you!

Joseph has come to understand himself as an agent of God called to proclaim God’s mercy. This is a frequent situation in the Bible: God uses ordinary humans to bring about the well-being of persons in struggle.

Many theologians today suggest that God does not overrule the built-in laws of God’s creation – and certainly does not interfere by creating natural disasters. Rather, people often have a hand in the genesis of natural disasters while other persons who are intimately in touch with their Creator, Redeemer, and Guide; have respect for all of God’s creation; and care deeply for others who suffer act to bring about relief from oppression, persecution, and natural disasters as agents of forgiveness, healing and change.

These theologians also suggest that our understanding of Natural Law must continue to develop as science expands our understanding of the workings of the universe and its innumerable parts…

Today’s Gospel reports Jesus urging his Apostles: “As you go, make this proclamation: ‘The Kingdom of heaven is at hand’. Cure… raise… cleanse… drive out… ”

How is the Spirit of God urging us to be God’s agents in our time?

 

Fr. John M. Lee, C.P., is Retreat Director of Bishop Molloy Retreat House, “The Passionist Spiritual Center in New York City”,   www.bishopmolloy.org