Daily Reflections

Agony in the garden

Thy Will Be Done

February 13, 2018

Today people around the world are celebrating Mardi gras, supposedly a ‘blow out’ before Ash Wednesday and the restrictions of our Lenten season.

In Passionist Communities around the world we celebrate the Mass of the Agony in the Garden on this Tuesday.  Mathew tells us that Jesus took his close friends Peter, James and John to a place they knew well, the garden of Gethsemane. Jesus wanted to spend time in prayer and he wanted the support of these friends. Mathew tells us that Jesus became grieved even unto death and agitated. He knew he was in trouble with the religious authorities. Cleansing the Temple was the last straw. Not knowing what tomorrow would bring he prayed for the strength to face whatever was to be. Peter, James and John avoided the tension by sleeping. They didn’t say, ‘Lord it is good for us to be here,’ like they said on the mount of the Transfiguration.

Jesus’ whole prayer is summed up in the simple words, ‘Father if it is possible let this chalice pass me by, (then the words of total surrender) ‘not my will but your will be done.” We echo those words every time we say the Our Father; ‘Thy will be done.’ We can pray for ourselves and for each other that we say them with the same conviction Jesus said them that fatal night.

Fr. Paul Cusack, C.P.

 

 Feb. 13

Today people around the world are celebrating Mardi gras, supposedly a ‘blow out’ before Ash Wednesday and the restrictions of our Lenten season.

In Passionist Communities around the world we celebrate the Mass of the Agony in the Garden on this Tuesday.  Mathew tells us the Jesus took his close friends Peter, James and John to a place they knew well, the garden of Gethsemane. Jesus wanted to spend time in prayer and he wanted the support of these friends. Mathew tells us that Jesus became grieved even unto death and agitated. He knew he was in trouble with the religious authorities. Cleansing the Temple was the last straw. Not knowing what tomorrow would bring he prayed for the strength to face whatever was to be. Peter, James and John avoided the tension by sleeping. They didn’t say, ‘Lord it is good for us to be here,’ like they said on the mount of the Transfiguration.

Jesus’ whole prayer is summed up in the simple words, ‘Father if it is possible let this chalice pass me by, (then the words of total surrender) ‘not my will but your will be done.” We echo those words every time we say the Our Father; ‘Thy will be done.’ We can pray for ourselves and for each other that we say them with the same conviction Jesus said them that fatal night.

Fr. Paul Cusack, C.P.